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4-357 (Text)

Item metadata
Speaker:
addressee,male author,male,Stephen, M.H.,un
ns1:discourse_type
Letter
Word Count :
349
Plaint Text :
ns1:register
Government English
ns1:texttype
Imperial Correspondence
ns1:localityName
http://dbpedia.org/resource/New_South_Wales
Created:
1896
Identifier
4-357
Source
Letters Federal Convention Bathurst 1896
pages
116
Document metadata
Extent:
1969
Identifier
4-357-plain.txt
Title
4-357#Text
Type
Text

4-357-plain.txt — 1 KB

File contents



Mr. Justice Stephen.
Judge's Chambers,
Supreme Court, Sydney,
6th Nov., 1896.
Sir, - 
I have the honour to acknowledge your letter of the 26th ultimo, inviting the expression of my interest in the undertaking of the Bathurst Federation League in advancement of the cause of Federation. This, at your request, I most readily give.
I should be sorry by losing the opportunity thus given me to appear indifferent to a movement which should be regarded with the highest interest by every member of the community. I cannot assume, as you would appear to do, that any such expression can have influence upon the actions and opinions of others. But if each unit in the community holds and expresses the view that I myself hold, then the desired end is accomplished, so that I thus do my part.
May I mention that years ago I presided at a banquet given on its return to one of the first united cricketing teams that visited England. It fell to my lot to propose the toast of the evening. My speech was reported almost verbatim except the concluding sentence expressing the hope that this union of the colonies was but a foretaste and emblem of a higher union in the future. Federation was not then "in the air." But I have never since ceased to watch with interest and hope every step that has been taken to promote the union of the colonies into a nation. I long for a national sentiment to supersede a provincial one, that the inhabitants of each colony may see "Advance Australia" in its widest sense.
Apart from the material advantages of union, it must tend to the elevation of the people into a higher place of patriotism and conception of their importance and responsibilities. The term "colony" may be abolished, but still as a nation we may remain, as I trust we shall at least for many years, a part and parcel of and one in interest with the British Empire. 
I have the honour to be, Your obedient Servant, 
M. H. STEPHEN. Dr. Machattie, President. 

http://ns.ausnc.org.au/corpora/cooee/source/4-357#Text