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4-349 (Text)

Item metadata
Speaker:
author,male,Lamington,un addressee,male
ns1:discourse_type
Letter
Word Count :
332
Plaint Text :
ns1:register
Government English
ns1:texttype
Imperial Correspondence
ns1:localityName
http://dbpedia.org/resource/Queensland
Created:
1896
Identifier
4-349
Source
Letters Federal Convention Bathurst 1896
pages
112
Document metadata
Extent:
1965
Identifier
4-349-plain.txt
Title
4-349#Text
Type
Text

4-349-plain.txt — 1 KB

File contents



From His Excellency the Governor of Queensland.
Government House, Brisbane, Nov. 10th, 1896.
Sir, - 
I am much obliged for your letter, and I shall be happy if by sending you these few lines I am able to give encouragement to the discussion as to the best means of bringing about a Federal Union of the Australian Colonies, and one that is likely to be acceptable to the great majority of the people.
I regret I am unable to find the papers you state you were good enough to send me, by which I should have learnt in greater detail as to your immediate objects and proposed procedure.
I need not dwell on the benefits likely to arise from Federation, but I strongly feel that even if there is not at the present moment a sufficiently strong feeling for the construction of the complete machinery of a Federal Government, yet there is already in existence a framework, which clothed with the necessary authority, might be enabled to deal with matters of common interest to the different colonies. I refer to such subjects as defence, coast-lights and others, which duly enumerated might be more advantageously worked by a central system.
There being no outside pressure to render Federation immediately essential it would seem to be safer to evolve a Federal Constitution, by a gradual process, than to attempt to create one by a single act.
Whatever course may find favour at your gathering every welcome ought to be extended to those who seek to remove what may be termed unnatural and artificial barriers to the trade, intercourse and general development of Australia.
The history of Great Britain and the marvellous expansion of the greatness and wealth of our kinsmen in the United States are examples of what a liberal and freedom loving policy can effect.
Hoping that the meeting of the Bathurst Federation Convention may bear good fruit in the future, 
I am, Sir, your obedient Servant,
LAMINGTON.
The President Bathurst Federation League.

http://ns.ausnc.org.au/corpora/cooee/source/4-349#Text