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4-128 (Original)

Item metadata
Speaker:
author,male,The Age,un addressee,male
ns1:discourse_type
Letter
Word Count :
452
Plaint Text :
ns1:register
Public Written
ns1:texttype
Official Correspondence
ns1:localityName
http://dbpedia.org/resource/Victoria
Created:
1887
Identifier
4-128
Source
Clark, 1975
pages
789-90
Document metadata
Extent:
2658
Identifier
4-128.txt
Title
4-128#Original
Type
Original

4-128.txt — 2 KB

File contents



<source><g=m><o=a><age=un><status=2><abode=nv><p=vic><r=pcw><tt=oc><4-128>
SIR,
As there appears to be a general feeling that justice was not done in the recent cases of Sutton v. Deerhurst and vice versa, I think the suggestion of your correspondent, "Justice", to request the Mayor to call a public meeting in the Town Hall to consider the action of the magistrates is a very good one. In the betting transaction the lord did not act altogether as a man of honor. Sutton gave him plenty of time, considerably more than the bookmaker would have got from the lord had the lord been the winner; but Deerhurst, after a lot of shuffling, winds up by sending an insulting note to Sutton, and after some time longer pays the amount into the club, because he was compelled to do so or be disgraced. In the trivial assault case, which should never have been brought into court, one party was as bad as the other, anyone who heard the evidence must admit; and consequently both cases should have been dismissed, or both parties imprisoned for the same period. Sutton is alleged to be a man of immoral character. Even if that be true, is it any reason why he should not receive justice? The young lord's own character will not stand investigation, judging by his answer when Mr. Duffy asked permission to question him on that point. This matter should not be allowed to drop. We, as free-born Australians, will not have our liberties trifled with for the benefit of privileged sprigs of "nobility", who with their arrogant assumption of superiority are not wanted in Australia, except by a few grovelling toadies. I believe that in many parts of the United Kingdom it is impossible for an ordinary civilian to obtain justice against one of the privileged class; but our justices must be taught that a lord is of no consequence out here, and that there is the same law for the highly and the lowly. It looked very bad for Lord Dudley to Sit on the bench. - Yours, &c.,
AUSTRALIAN.
To THE EDITOR OF The Age. 
SIR,
Might I suggest that the least appreciation the noble father of a certain young lord could show of the behaviour of the majority of the magistrates who on Thursday last so abjectly acknowledged and bowed down to caste would be to at once telegraph for them to accompany his son on his voyage home (which I suppose must be on an early date) as a sort of escort. By accepting the invitation they would have the advantage of going to Coventry voluntarily, instead of being sent there as they deserve to be by every right thinking colonial. [790] - Yours, &c.,
C.D.F.
<\4-128><\g=m><\o=a><\age=un><\status=2><\abode=nv><\p=vic><\r=pcw><\tt=oc>

http://ns.ausnc.org.au/corpora/cooee/source/4-128#Original