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3-263 (Original)

Item metadata
Speaker:
author,male,Michie,un addressee
ns1:discourse_type
Oratory
Word Count :
230
Plaint Text :
ns1:register
Speech Based
ns1:texttype
Speeches
ns1:localityName
http://dbpedia.org/resource/Victoria
Created:
1870
Identifier
3-263
Source
Clark, 1975
pages
246-47
Document metadata
Extent:
2523
Identifier
3-263.txt
Title
3-263#Original
Type
Original

3-263.txt — 2 KB

File contents



<source><g=m><o=u><age=un><status=2><abode=un><p=vic><r=spb><tt=sp><3-263>
[...] in consequence of the proximity of the United States and Canada to Europe, a large stream of population must flow, and is continually flowing to those countries hose who were rich enough might come, but others must stop away. If Australia were as accessible from England as the United States and Canada, these regulations would be superfluous. The regulations are only required to adjust the difference between the countries. A passage from England to the United States or Canada can be obtained for £3 or £4, but to come to this country costs £15 or £16. Under these circumstances, does the honorable and learned member suppose that for 100 persons who go to the United States and Canada one will come here? The honorable and learned member cannot escape the conclusion that this is the cause why we receive such a small number of immigrants while thousands are pouring into the United States. Is this country to remain perpetually without any addition to the population - without any new blood? If the country is to advance, if we are to grow up a community worthy of being called a nation, and able to keep up armaments, and hold our own against other nations, it is absolutely necessary that we should have an increase of our population from without as well as from within. The honorable and learned member for Brighton [i.e. Mr Higinbotham] may make war against Rogers [i.e. the permanent UnderSecretary of State for the Colonies] or any other obnoxious character on the other side of the world; but it is ridiculous for us to take up high ground and assume a warlike attitude while we have a population contemptible in numbers as compared with the powers we assume. In all the large movements of nations power and strength lie, like other things, in population; and in proportion to a nation's population is its respectability, power, and influence among the other communities of the world ("No.") I say "Yes." [247] All things being equal, population is a large and most material element of power and respectability in any nation; and it is because I desire by every legitimate means to advance the respectability, power, influence, and prosperity of this country, that I certainly feel the necessity - whatever may be the personal consequences to myself - of supporting resolutely the immigration regulations which we have had the honour to submit.
<\3-263><\g=m><\o=u><\age=un><\status=2><\abode=un><\p=vic><\r=spb><\tt=sp>

http://ns.ausnc.org.au/corpora/cooee/source/3-263#Original