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3-155 (Raw)

Item metadata
Speaker:
addressee author,male,Deniehy, Daniel Henry,30
ns1:discourse_type
Oratory
Word Count :
352
Plaint Text :
ns1:register
Speech Based
ns1:texttype
Speeches
ns1:localityName
http://dbpedia.org/resource/New_South_Wales
Created:
1858
Identifier
3-155
Source
Deniehy, 1884
pages
62-63
Document metadata
Extent:
2154
Identifier
3-155-raw.txt
Title
3-155#Raw
Type
Raw

3-155-raw.txt — 2 KB

File contents



<source><g=m><o=a><age=30><status=2><abode=nv><p=nsw><r=spb><tt=sp><3-155>
MR. DENIEHY said he was surprised to hear hon. members asking for a postponement of so important a Bill after they had expressed their convictions that the subject was one which ought to be dealt with at once. Those hon. gentlemen who desired this measure withdrawn in order that a prohibitory Bill might be introduced, could not fail to see that they might attain their object by moving in committee that the amount levied be raised from £3 to £10, to £20 or £30. In consequence of the discovery of gold in the country, we were threatened by an overwhelming influx of barbarians, men of low social and mental development, and given to the in dulgence of vices unfit to be named by a decent man. If this immigration continued on a large scale it would impart to the country a barbarous and degraded aspect, and the colonial descent would be of decidedly inferior caste. The simple question was this - The country stood upon the brink of a great disaster, and it naturally looked to its Parliament to check that disaster; and the Legislature had a right to deal with the matter on the grounds of policy and public expediency. He, Mr. Denichy, saw no more injustice in preventing the landing of this degraded race, who would not only lower and demoralize, but also endanger the safety of the country, than he saw in stopping the "running" of a cargo of contraband opium or brandy. He must say that opposition to the Bill came with a very bad grace from hon. members; but they always had to dread a latent and illicit hankering after the introduction of inferior races for the purpose of obtaining cheap labour. They had seen attempt after attempt made to bring here the Coolie and the Eurasian. He had much pleasure in supporting the second reading of the Bill ; and if hon. gentlemen were sincere in their expressions of the desirability of passing the measure without delay, they would, to a man, vote for the second reading, and make it prohibitory as they pleased when in committee. [63]
<\3-155><\g=m><\o=a><\age=30><\status=2><\abode=nv><\p=nsw><\r=spb><\tt=sp>

http://ns.ausnc.org.au/corpora/cooee/source/3-155#Raw