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3-093 (Original)

Item metadata
Speaker:
addressee,male author,male,Norton, James,un
ns1:discourse_type
Letter
Word Count :
15
Plaint Text :
ns1:register
Government English
ns1:texttype
Imperial Correspondence
ns1:localityName
http://dbpedia.org/resource/New_South_Wales
Created:
1854
Identifier
3-093
Source
Bennett, 1979
pages
16-17
Document metadata
Extent:
1818
Identifier
3-093.txt
Title
3-093#Original
Type
Original

3-093.txt — 1 KB

File contents



<source><g=m><o=u><age=un><status=1><abode=un><p=nsw><r=gen><tt=ic><3-093>
The barbarous policy of early Governors has prevented the execution of many of these important [public] works; and it will, perhaps, be asked how any of them could have been performed in the earlier days of the colony? I answer, that nothing was better suited for convict discipline.
It surely was not the object of the British Government to punish without reforming the offender; and what could be better adapted to the work of reformation than the execution of such works? Instead of pouring the corrupted mass into private families, or coercing the convict by the lash, he should have been fairly and fully paid for his work - he should ever have an interest in his amendment - should, even at the latest period, have the means afforded of supporting himself by useful labour. [17]
If he were employed in the execution of public undertakings, and his work accurately measured and properly paid for, he would have the greatest inducement to acquire habits of industry.
Suppose every man's labour were carried to his credit (a rateable deduction being first made for general medical attendance, and the support of the sick), that he were then charged for his clothing and maintenance, and the balance held at his credit until free; and that he were then allowed to return to his country, or settle in the colony. With habits of industry acquired during his probation, and generally possessing the means of entering upon some beneficial employment, he would have the greatest inducement to become a useful and reformed member of society. What better discipline Could be provided for the road-gangs, or the drunkards who now idle away their time in gaols?
<\3-093><\g=m><\o=u><\age=un><\status=1><\abode=un><\p=nsw><\r=gen><\tt=ic>

http://ns.ausnc.org.au/corpora/cooee/source/3-093#Original